Upstream Field Guide: Lesson 4 Your Purpose Exercise 5

Today I need to travel back in time a bit and think about my childhood, around age 6-8. What do I aspire to be when I grow up? This age range is good because I’m young enough not to feel jaded by the realities of life but old enough to consider my real desires and fascinations. Usually answers to such question can be far-fetched but it’s not so much of the specifics but rather what it was that I love about my career choices at that age. Hmm…..

I seriously do not recall a huge chunk of my childhood. I don’t know if it’s because my childhood was rather uneventful or I just have a poor memory. In any case, I don’t think I was very self-aware at that age. I tried asking my mom and siblings but none of them remember what I wanted to be when I was a child. What I do remember is what I fantasized about. I know for certain that I was very hooked on Enid Blyton’s series of fairy tales! I’d save up the allowances that my parents gave me to buy these books. It became an obsession and I look forward to days when I can visit the book store to pick a copy. I spent a lot of my younger days reading them and living in a fantasy world of enchanted forests, gnomes and elves. The stories played out in a very visual way in my mind. I don’t remember making up an imaginary story of my own but I could “see” these stories vividly in my mind as I read them. What I can draw from this memory is that my intuition was pretty active as a child. I am also a highly visual person so I am sensitive to visual stimulation. But all these doesn’t give me clues to what I wanted to be. The closest to an answer to this question is a time, I believe it was towards the end of middle school, that my older brother asked me something along the line of what kind of life do I envision for myself. I remember vaguely that I struggled putting into words a vision of a simple country life surrounded by beauty and living happily ever after, just contented being my own space at my own pace. I remember feeling embarrassed that my brother might find me overly simplistic and unsophisticated. Gosh….how far have I strayed from that vision. My life now is nothing like that. Still, this does not answer the question about vocation. So let me try searching my memory bank a little more.

I remember being part of an unofficial student-initiated cheerleading team and I enjoyed staying back after school for practices. When I moved to middle school, I got excited about participating in a fashion show showcasing traditional cultural costumes. There was also a time when I sang a Boy George song solo in front of class and it freaked me out. I never attempted it ever again! I signed up for external aerobics dance classes with my sister and looked forward to those too. When I think about these seemingly uncharacteristic activities for introverts,  I deduce that they point to a desire for freedom of expression even though I am uncomfortable being in the spotlight. I enjoyed participating as a group rather than solo, perhaps to reduce the discomfort of being the center of attention.

So that’s it. These are the insights I gleaned from this exercise. Can’t wait to get the next one over and done with.

rk

 

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Upstream Field Guide: Lesson 4 Your Purpose Exercise 2

The next part of finding my purpose is to “discover my greatest vexation” as Tsh puts it. Because what’s bothering us is usually what we wish would change and that in turn can reveal our desire to fix those problems or to be a part of the solution. Even if our life purpose is not to be an agent of change in big spectacular ways, our irritants point to what we want to make better at least in our own lives. So in this exercise, I get to rant and write down what irritates/ angers/ bothers me most, without over analyzing the meaning behind them. I then look to see if there is a common thread among them.

What irritates me….

Laziness. Incompetence. Not being proactive. Overly reliant. Poor time keeping. Indecisiveness. Stinginess. Inability to live up to role. Interruptions. Multitasking. Not taking ownership. Lax attitude. Clutter/messy spaces. Hoarding.
Lack of knowledge. Out-of-touch with society. Not planning ahead. Insensitive. Poor service. Being imposed upon. Disorder. Too many ridiculous rules. Office politics.
Excessively concerned with pleasing a certain figure/group of people. Rigidity.
Mindless small talk. Networking events. Too much paperwork. Lack of independence.
Intrusion. Poor service. Loud. Wasting time. Passivity. Phone calls. Chores. Pressure to sell. Tight spaces. Hectic. Lacking discipline. Overly simplistic – not acknowledging a deeper issue. Lacking integrity & trustworthiness.

 

rk

Upstream Field Guide: Lesson 4 Your Purpose Exercise 1

My Purpose

…and the self-assessment continues!

I must admit, this is getting really tedious and daunting for me. I thought I’m was done with data collecting from all the self-assessment exercises in lessons two and three but there’s more in this lesson! I want to cry! But I’ve come this far, I can’t stop now. So let’s move on….

I’ll pause here and share an excerpt from Tsh in this lesson. It encapsulates how I feel about starting this upstream paddling in the first place.

I believe a person’s universal purpose in life involves his or her Maker. I really like Catholic scholar Harold Koenig’s explanation of our universal life purpose: he says we’re all here to simply “to love and serve God, and to love and serve others.” He then goes on to say, “It’s really so very, very simple. When we are fulfilling that purpose, then that place deep down inside of us fills up and we experience peace and happiness. When we’re not, and we begin focusing on our own self and our own needs exclusively, then other emotions start flooding in.” In fact, I’d argue that part of our journey in life involves the very practice of discovering why we’re here on earth. In other words, part of our purpose on earth is to explore our purpose on earth. It seems like we were made to wrestle with this kind of stuff, to talk through it, to deepen our relationships because of it, to become more whole and alive and at peace when we pursue our reason for being here in a healthy manner. And I believe part of that health comes by knowing ourselves deeply, knowing ourselves well. That’s what we’re doing here in Upstream.

For ease, I like to think of the foundational, basic answer to the question, “What are we here for?” with that answer from Harold Koenig: “to love and serve God, and to love and serve others.” 

Exercise 1

Tsh recommends that the most direct way to understand our purpose is to understand our desires. What do we enjoy? What fuels us? What keeps us reading and learning more; what moves us to tears? I will now attempt to draw insights from the exercise I did on My Best Day in lesson 2 and see what they reveal about my desires. Because the entire exercise is based on a scenario birthed purely from my desires, there should be plentiful breadcrumbs to follow. To work on this more efficiently, I reproduced a copy of that exercise here and next to each clue I put down the desires they’re pointing to in brackets. I will then consolidate them and draw up the common themes that I see.

I start the day fairly early (intention) after a night of restful sleep (health). There is no agenda for the day (freedom, spontaneity) so I am completely free and unhurried (slow pace). Everyone else is asleep (personal space and time) and there is complete silence (peace). I tidy up the house a little and ensure my space is clean and uncluttered (intention, beauty, simplicity, minimalism, order). I down 2 glasses of purified water with some ACV to kick start my body (health) and puts the kettle on the stove for a cup of herbal tea (nature’s gift). I put a few drops of grounding EO blend in the diffuser (balance, stability, sensory, sensitivity, nature’s gift) and starts it while I take my shower. My bathroom is bright (clarity, optimism), clean and dry (sensory sensitivity). After a pampering shower (self-care/love) I step out to a lovely scented room (sensory) which I have all to myself (personal space) and starts to blow dry my hair (self-care). I change into something comfortable (comfort, sensory) and settle down on a cozy couch (comfort, home) with my herbal tea to start my devotional time with God and prayer (spirituality).

I put together a simple and healthy breakfast (health) and eats it while catching up on the day’s headline news on TV (overview, general knowledge) . Everyone else starts to wake and prepare themselves to leave for work and school. After cleaning up (intention, order, beauty), I head out for a hike in the mountains (nature, beauty, activity, sacred) with my daughter (companionship).

The fresh cool mountain air (sensory, optimism, clarity), lush greenery (nature, beauty, abundance) and scent of fresh dew (sensory, newness, fresh start) in the woods is grounding for my soul (stability, security, peace). I feel like I can hide away from the world (invisible, smallness, security); like a sort  of refuge (security, safety). My daughter makes good company (companionship). We chat about everything under the sun (camaraderie, connection, friendship) as we make our way up (exploration, advancement). After a while we seek out an open valley (beauty, nature, space) and take a break by a scenic stream (beauty, peace) surrounded by picturesque landscape (beauty, nature) and the gentle sound (gentle, sensory) of rustling leaves and flowing water (nature, sensory). We brought some snacks along and ate them (down-to-earth) as we enjoy the tranquility of the surroundings (beauty, peace, nature, comfort). For a change of energy (active energy) we engage is some people-watching (passivity, observation). We like that the crowd is just right, not too large (balance, moderation). We then make our way up to one of the peaks for the awesome view (space, freedom, openness, beauty, clarity). I soak in the liberating sensation of being on top of the world (freedom, in control, smallness). Feeling small and insignificant in such massive spaces (space, freedom) feels strangely comforting and reassuring (comfort, reassurance); like it’s OK to be imperfect and make mistakes (acceptance, ordinary, human) because the world is so much more than just me and my life (higher purpose).

After taking some Nat Geo worthy pictures (skillful, creativity, recognition) we make our way down, reaching the base in time for lunch at a cozy cottage style eatery (home, comfort, laid back) overlooking the valley (beauty). We sat outdoors (space, freshness, nature) and enjoy a nice leisurely lunch (slow pace) before heading home.

At home I catch up on some updates on social media (current, relevance, social), check my emails (on track) and watch an episode or 2 of my favorite k-drama (intention, Korean culture). The weather is beautiful outside so I hopped onto our garden swing (innocence, playful, novelty) with a soft blanket (comfort, home), a good book (intuit, absorb, knowledge, connect, inspire) and a warm cup of tea and freshly baked scones (home). Soon I am asleep (rest) to the gentle lull of the swing (comfort) and the sweet aroma of fresh flowers and herbs in the garden (sensory, nature). It was a short nap but I wake up refreshed and energized.

I head out for a walk (activity) in the neighborhood (familiarity) with my daughter. I love the juxtaposition of old and new (old & new, variety, novelty, roots) in this quaint neighborhood (charm, attractive, unique, character) and the mix of energetic vibe and creative air (energy, creativity). The people here are quietly warm and friendly (mild, warmth, casual, friendly), without imposing (privacy). The streets are filled with pretty and interesting things at every turn and corner (variety, novelty, unique, fun). We enjoy our stroll exploring the alleys (exploration) in this hilly (elevation) neighborhood. Interesting cafes and tea houses with al-fresco sitting and scenic patios dotted the landscape (beauty, charm, quaint, character, casual elegance, laid back). We stop by one to enjoy a cup of hot sweet potato latte (Korean culture) and some fine cakes and pastries (sensory pleasure). On the street in front there’s a young busker playing the guitar and singing a ballad from one of my favorite K-drama OST (sensory pleasure, music, Korean culture).  We reminisce about old times (nostalgia), laughed and joked about how silly we were then (laughter, camaraderie). After picking up some desserts for dinner later, we stop by a florist that looks more like a greenhouse (nature) to pick out a cute potted daisy for our kitchen window (home, beauty, cheer). It’ll add more cheer to the place! Next to the florist is a small art gallery (art, beauty). We spotted a piece of fine Korean art (art, beauty, hand-crafted) and thought it’ll look great in the dining room so we got that too.

The free market is on today! (carefree, vibrancy, variety, novelty, alternative lifestyle)  We can’t miss it! We love the vibrant, carefree and bohemian atmosphere there. The plethora of things to see, taste and hear is fun and exciting (fun, excitement, sensory pleasure). We pick-up a few interesting trinkets, accessories, handcrafted scents and wares and sampled some home-baked goods (hand-crafted, authentic, original). Soon it’s time to head home. We chose to walk (intention, activity, leisure) instead of taking the metro or public bus to avoid the crowd and congestion (space, privacy).

I look forward to meet my siblings and mom at my sister’s place for dinner tonight (family, home, roots). Each of us takes turn to host a dinner every month (balance, fairness). We enjoy catching up on each other’s lives as we bond over a home cooked meal (family, home, connection, camaraderie). I get some work done on my laptop (productivity), freshen up (self-image) and headed out with the family. We enjoy a nice meal together, laughing and chatting. After dinner we chill out at the patio with drinks and desserts (casual, connection, rest). The night went by quickly and soon we’re headed home. I do some end-of-day tidying (intention, productivity, tidiness) before winding down for the day. I diffuse a relaxing blend of EO (nature’s gift, sensory pleasure) and dim the lights as I prop myself up against the pillow on my bed and spends some time journaling and in prayer (reflection, spirituality) . I turn in early to ensure I am well rested for the next day (self-care).

Common themes that point to my desires.
State of being:
freedom, peace, health, balance, stability, clarity, optimism, self-care/love, comfort, home, spirituality, abundance, newness, fresh start, security, safety, gentleness, down-to-earth, moderation, openness, in control, smallness, innocence, intuition, leisure, reflection, harmony, higher purpose, relevance, inspiration

Energy:
slow paced, laid back, spontaneity, intention, exploration, advancement, active energy, passive observation, absorb, creativity, playful, rest, familiarity, fun, carefree, vibrancy, excitement, productivity, nostalgia,

Environment:
personal space & time, beauty, simplicity, minimalism, order, sensory pleasure, nature’s gift, nature, vast spaces, novelty, old & new, variety,  elevation, quaint, character, casual elegance, laid back, music, tidiness, harmony, sacred

Relationship:
companionship, camaraderie, connection, friendship, acceptance, reassurance, recognition, warmth, casual, friendly, privacy, laughter, cheer, family, harmony

Others:
ordinary, knowledge, roots, charm, attractive, unique, character, fairness, self-image, Korean culture, art, hand-crafted, alternative lifestyle, authentic, original, quality, skillful, big picture, general knowledge, to be current.

rk

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The Art of Simple

Upstream Field Guide: Lesson 3 Who Are You Part 3-4

What are my strengths?

Now we’ve come to the final bit of the self-assessment exercise – finding my top 5 strengths. It’s important to be aware of our strengths so we can to use them to our advantage. The new school of thought is that we’re better off taping on our God-given strengths and using them well instead of working to improve on our weaknesses.

Tsh recommends Gallup Strength Center for the strength finder assessment but since I’ve already taken a similar test at Truity for free, I’ll save on the USD$15 and use that report instead.

Top 5 personal strengths.

Strengths of Intellect
Wisdom 70% 
Love for learning  65% 
Judgment  63%
Curiosity  48%
Creativity 35%

Strengths of Self-Management
Prudence 73% 
Humility 65%
Perseverance 65%
Honesty 65% 
Self-control 63%
Courage 30%

Social Strengths
Fairness 63%
Forgiveness 58%
Social Intelligence 55%
Teamwork 53%
Kindness 50%
Capacity for Love 48%
Leadership 45%

Strengths of Joy
Spirituality 68% 
Awe 63%
Gratitude 60%
Optimism 56%
Enthusiasm 48%
Humor 38%

Strengths that I bring to my job
Organization and drive, good stress tolerance, emotional stability and resilience, able to negotiate a balance between meeting own needs and needs of others.

rk

Upstream Field Guide: Lesson 3 Who Are You Part 2-3

What’s my Enneagram type?

Next up we explore the personality profiling system called Enneagram. I’ve heard of Enneagram but never explored nor try to understand it. It seems rather complex. According to Tsh, it is not based on hard science or even psychology but it is unique because it helps explain our behavior and outlook in different times and situations, particularly in times of stress. Both MBTI and Enneagram work well together because one is more about the way our brain functions (our core wiring), while the other tells us about the motivations behind what we do and how we think. It also explores our strengths and weaknesses. I’m certainly curious! It was suggested that one of the ways to figure out your type is to read up on each of the 9 types and see which resonates most. But me being me prefers more accuracy and less guessing so I paid a small fee to take the Riso-Hudson Enneagram Type Indicator (RHETI). It turns out I’m a Type One with a 9 wing (1w9). It’s a little surprising as One seems a little too driven for me. If I had to choose based on reading the type descriptions alone I’d be so confused. Firstly because there is so much data on each type, secondly I see a part of myself in a few types. So I’d really recommend someone to take a test for better clarity.

My top 3 scores are

Type 1 (Reformer) – 26
Type 9 (Peacemaker) – 23
Type 6 (Loyalist) – 18
Type 5 (investigator) – 18
Type 4 (Individualist) – 17

I scored highest for 1, followed by 9 and third highest is a tie between 6,5,4. According to RHEIT, my primary type is most likely the highest of these scores (which is 1) and most definitely among the highest two or three. That’s not helpful cos there are 3 types in a tie for my third highest! Together with my results, they also attached detailed descriptions of my 3 highest scored types (5 types in my case!).So I had to read though 50 pages of data! All in all, I think it is pretty accurate. Just bear in mind that we all will find ourselves a variant of a few types but our primary type should stand out most while our wing a close second.

Here’s a summary of the 5 types. Statements I identify with are in bold. [Source: The Enneagram Institute.] You can view a more comprehensive description of all 9 types here.

Type One in Brief

Ones are conscientious and ethical, with a strong sense of right and wrong. They are teachers, crusaders, and advocates for change: always striving to improve things, but afraid of making a mistake. Well-organized, orderly, and fastidious, they try to maintain high standards, but can slip into being critical and perfectionistic. They typically have problems with resentment and impatienceAt their Best: wise, discerning, realistic, and noble. Can be morally heroic.

  • Basic Fear: Of being corrupt/evil, defective
  • Basic Desire: To be good, to have integrity, to be balanced
  • Enneagram One with a Nine-Wing: “The Idealist”
  • Enneagram One with a Two-Wing: “The Advocate”

Key Motivations: Want to be right, to strive higher and improve everything, to be consistent with their ideals, to justify themselves, to be beyond criticism so as not to be condemned by anyone.

When moving in their Direction of Disintegration (stress), methodical Ones suddenly become moody and irrational at Four. However, when moving in their Direction of Integration (growth), angry, critical Ones become more spontaneous and joyful, like healthy Sevens.

Type Nine in Brief

Nines are accepting, trusting, and stable. They are usually creative, optimistic, and supportive, but can also be too willing to go along with others to keep the peace. They want everything to go smoothly and be without conflict, but they can also tend to be complacent, simplifying problems and minimizing anything upsetting. They typically have problems with inertia and stubbornnessAt their Best: indomitable and all-embracing, they are able to bring people together and heal conflicts.

  • Basic Fear: Of loss and separation
  • Basic Desire: To have inner stability “peace of mind”
  • Enneagram Nine with an Eight-Wing: “The Referee”
  • Enneagram Nine with a One-Wing: “The Dreamer”

Key Motivations: Want to create harmony in their environment, to avoid conflicts and tension, to preserve things as they are, to resist whatever would upset or disturb them.

When moving in their Direction of Disintegration (stress), complacent Nines suddenly become anxious and worried at Six. However, when moving in their Direction of Integration (growth), slothful, self-neglecting Nines become more self-developing and energetic, like healthy Threes.

Type Six in Brief

The committed, security-oriented type. Sixes are reliable, hard-working, responsible, and trustworthy. Excellent “troubleshooters,” they foresee problems and foster cooperation, but can also become defensive, evasive, and anxious—running on stress while complaining about it. They can be cautious and indecisive, but also reactive, defiant and rebellious. They typically have problems with self-doubt and suspicionAt their Best: internally stable and self-reliant, courageously championing themselves and others.

  • Basic Fear: Of being without support and guidance
  • Basic Desire: To have security and support
  • Enneagram Six with a Five-Wing: “The Defender”
  • Enneagram Six with a Seven-Wing: “The Buddy”

Key Motivations: Want to have security, to feel supported by others, to have certitude and reassurance, to test the attitudes of others toward them, to fight against anxiety and insecurity.

When moving in their Direction of Disintegration (stress), dutiful Sixes suddenly become competitive and arrogant at Three. However, when moving in their Direction of Integration (growth), fearful, pessimistic Sixes become more relaxed and optimistic, like healthy Nine.

Type Five in Brief

Fives are alert, insightful, and curious. They are able to concentrate and focus on developing complex ideas and skills. Independent, innovative, and inventive, they can also become preoccupied with their thoughts and imaginary constructs. They become detached, yet high-strung and intense. They typically have problems with eccentricity, nihilism, and isolation. At their Best: visionary pioneers, often ahead of their time, and able to see the world in an entirely new way.

  • Basic Fear: Being useless, helpless, or incapable
  • Basic Desire: To be capable and competent
  • Enneagram Five with a Four-Wing: “The Iconoclast”
  • Enneagram Five with a Six-Wing: “The Problem Solver”

Key Motivations: Want to possess knowledge, to understand the environment, to have everything figured out as a way of defending the self from threats from the environment.

When moving in their Direction of Disintegration (stress), detached Fives suddenly become hyperactive and scattered at Seven. However, when moving in their Direction of Integration (growth), avaricious, detached Fives become more self-confident and decisive, like healthy Eights.

Type Four in Brief

Fours are self-aware, sensitive, and reserved. They are emotionally honest, creative, and personal, but can also be moody and self-conscious. Withholding themselves from others due to feeling vulnerable and defective, they can also feel disdainful and exempt from ordinary ways of living. They typically have problems with melancholy, self-indulgence, and self-pity. At their Best: inspired and highly creative, they are able to renew themselves and transform their experiences.

  • Basic Fear: That they have no identity or personal significance
  • Basic Desire: To find themselves and their significance (to create an
       identity)
  • Enneagram Four with a Three-Wing: “The Aristocrat”
  • Enneagram Four with a Five-Wing: “The Bohemian”

Key Motivations: Want to express themselves and their individuality, to create and surround themselves with beauty, to maintain certain moods and feelings, to withdraw to protect their self-image, to take care of emotional needs before attending to anything else, to attract a “rescuer.”

When moving in their Direction of Disintegration (stress), aloof Fours suddenly become over-involved and clinging at Two. However, when moving in their Direction of Integration (growth), envious, emotionally turbulent Fours become more objective and principled, like healthy Ones.

 

rk

Upstream Field Guide: Lesson 2 Who Are You Part 1-1

Describe Your Best Day Ever!

In lesson 2 I work through some exercises to find clues to discover who I truly am at the core – my preferences, strengths, weaknesses and ultimately my passions. Not what I want to be, or what others say I am or should be, or what I believe was true about me. It is time to start embracing what is reality. It stems from the fundamental belief that God creates each of us with a unique make up and gifts so we can enrich others in ways that only we can.

So I start off with trying to describe my best day ever! Through it I will gain clues about my desires and how I’m wired. If I have the whole day to myself and I have total control of it, what would I do?

I start the day fairly early after a night of restful sleep. There is no agenda for the day so I am completely free and unhurried. Everyone else is asleep and there is complete silence. I tidy up the house a little and ensure my space is clean and uncluttered. I down 2 glasses of purified water with some ACV to kick start my body and puts the kettle on the stove for a cup of herbal tea. I put a few drops of grounding EO blend in the diffuser and starts it while I take my shower. My bathroom is bright, clean and dry. After a pampering shower I step out to a lovely scented room which I have all to myself and starts to blow dry my hair. I change into something comfortable and settle down on a cozy couch with my herbal tea to start my devotional time with God and prayer.

I put together a simple and healthy breakfast and eats it while catching up on the day’s headline news on TV. Everyone else starts to wake and prepare themselves to leave for work and school. After cleaning up, I head out for a hike in the mountains with my daughter.

The fresh cool mountain air, lush greenery and scent of fresh dew in the woods is grounding for my soul. I feel like I can hide away from the world; like a sort  of refuge. My daughter makes good company. We chat about everything under the sun as we make our way up. After a while we seek out an open valley and take a break by a scenic stream surrounded by picturesque landscape and the gentle sound of rustling leaves and flowing water. We brought some snacks along and ate them as we enjoy the tranquility of the surroundings. For a change of energy we engage is some people-watching. We like that the crowd is just right, not too large. We then make our way up to one of the peaks for the awesome view. I soak in the liberating sensation of being on top of the world. Feeling small and insignificant in such massive spaces feels strangely comforting and reassuring; like it’s OK to be imperfect and make mistakes because the world is so much more than just me and my life.

After taking some Nat Geo worthy pictures  we make our way down, reaching the base in time for lunch at a cozy cottage style eatery overlooking the valley. We sat outdoors and enjoy a nice leisurely lunch before heading home.

At home I catch up on some updates on social media, check my emails and watch an episode or 2 of my favorite k-drama. The weather is beautiful outside so I hopped onto our garden swing with a soft blanket, a good book and a warm cup of tea and freshly baked scones. Soon I am asleep to the gentle lull of the swing and the sweet aroma of fresh flowers and herbs in the garden. It was a short nap but I wake up refreshed and energized.

I head out for a walk in the neighborhood with my daughter. I love the juxtaposition of old and new in this quaint neighborhood and the mix of energetic vibe and creative air. The people here are quietly warm and friendly, without imposing. The streets are filled with pretty and interesting things at every turn and corner. We enjoy our stroll exploring the alleys in this hilly neighborhood. Interesting cafes and tea houses with al-fresco sitting and scenic patios dotted the landscape. We stop by one to enjoy a cup of hot sweet potato latte and some fine cakes and pastries. On the street in front there’s a young busker playing the guitar and singing a ballad from one of my favorite K-drama OST.  We reminisce about old times, laughed and joked about how silly we were then. After picking up some desserts for dinner later, we stop by a florist that looks more like a greenhouse to pick out a cute potted daisy for our kitchen window. It’ll add more cheer to the place! Next to the florist is a small art gallery. We spotted a piece of fine Korean art and thought it’ll look great in the dining room so we got that too.

The free market is on today! We can’t miss it! We love the vibrant, carefree and bohemian atmosphere there. The plethora of things to see, taste and hear is fun and exciting. We pick-up a few interesting trinkets, accessories, handcrafted scents and wares and sampled some home-baked goods. Soon it’s time to head home. We chose to walk instead of taking the metro or public bus to avoid the crowd and congestion.

I look forward to meet my siblings and mom at my sister’s place for dinner tonight. Each of us takes turn to host a dinner every month. We enjoy catching up on each other’s lives as we bond over a home cooked meal. I get some work done on my laptop, freshen up and headed out with the family. We enjoy a nice meal together, laughing and chatting. After dinner we chill out at the patio with drinks and desserts. The night went by quickly and soon we’re headed home. I do some end-of-day tidying before winding down for the day. I diffuse a relaxing blend of EO and dim the lights as I prop myself up against the pillow on my bed and spends some time journaling and in prayer . I turn in early to ensure I am well rested for the next day.

rk

 

On being an INTP – Intro

I’ve just decided to change my blog name to Random Thoughts of an INTP. As I have no set direction for this blog, you can expect more of such changes in the future. Oh well…
Will let it be fluid and not bother about where it leads or ends. This is after all just an outlet for me to organize my random thoughts on random topics of interest, so anything goes really. This is how I bring form to my thoughts, which can be very scattered. I find the process somewhat therapeutic.

My latest fascination is the study of personality types. The name of this blog reveals that I’m an INTP. One of the distinctive traits of an INTP is our tendency to challenge and test our own ideas and theories by way of arguing with ourselves. “An INTP arguing a point may very well be trying to convince himself as much as his opposition” (Joe Butt, Typelogic). As it is said, we are our own worst critic. And we’re good at playing devil’s advocate. So whatever I trash out here, take it with a grain of salt. Most of the time I am engaging in self-talk, either trying to understand myself, refuting my own ideas and theories or trying to convince myself that I am making sense. Truth is our God. Our search for understanding and quest for truth drives us to drill down to an issue, analyze it from all possible angles and eliminate inconsistencies. All these makes us INTPs look very intellectual, even intimidating to some. But it’s really just a way we gather and process information. Each type has its own unique strength. Personally, I find INTJs to be the most intimidating.

I had wanted to write about being an INTP in relation to my happiness and effectiveness at work in this post but seeing that the intro is already rather lengthy, I’ll let it stand on its own. If I feel like it, I will write about the latter in my next post. Studies revealed that INTPs, together with INFPs, score the highest of all types in career dissatisfaction (truity.com).